Expedition Details

 

Set out on an epic voyage to the remote lands made famous by Ernest Shackleton. Traveling aboard the ice-class expedition ships, National Geographic Explorer and National Geographic Orion, spend six days discovering the icy wonders of the Antarctic Peninsula. Stroll through lively crowds of penguins in stunning South Georgia, and hike the rocky shores of the Falkland Islands. Experience boundless wildlife and captivating beauty as you venture into some of the planet’s most unspoiled landscapes.

Trip Highlights

  • Set out from the National Geographic Explorer or National Geographic Orion in a Zodiac or kayak to get up close to the exquisite icebergs of the Antarctic Peninsula.
  • Trace the riveting story of Shackleton’s fateful expedition on South Georgia with our team of experts, and get immersed in a sea of black and white amid thousands of king penguins.
  • Visit the pioneer outposts of Port Stanley in the Falklands and Port Lockroy in Antarctica.
  • Get hands-on instruction from a National Geographic photographer as you frame breaching whales, elephant seals, and numerous penguin species.

Itinerary - 24 Days

Days 1 & 2 — U.S./Buenos Aires, Argentina (National Geographic Explorer) or Santiago, Chile (National Geographic Orion)

Depart on an overnight flight to Buenos Aires (National Geographic Explorer) or Santiago (National Geographic Orion). Settle into the Sofitel Buenos Aires before seeing the city’s Beaux-Arts palaces and the famous balcony associated with Eva Peron. Or settle in to Santiago’s Grand Hyatt Hotel before our guided overview of this vibrant city backed by the inspiring Andes.

Day 3 — Ushuaia, Argentina

This morning’s charter flight offers some rare views of Patagonia en route to Ushuaia, the world’s southernmost city. Take a catamaran cruise through Patagonia’s scenic Beagle Channel before embarking our ship.
(B,L,D)

Day 4 — At Sea

Awake well into our journey across the Drake Passage—€”a milestone in any adventurer'€™s personal travel history—with time to hear talks preparing you for the exciting days ahead.
(B,L,D)

Days 5 through 10 — Exploring Antarctica

With long daylight hours, we make the most of our six days exploring the Antarctic Peninsula and the surrounding islands. In keeping with the nature of an expedition, our schedule is flexible, allowing us to take advantage of the unexpected—pausing to watch whales off the bow, taking an after-dinner Zodiac cruise or an extra landing during the day. Those interested may have the opportunity to kayak.
(B,L,D daily)

We anticipate making several landings each day in Zodiacs to explore this vast land. Depending on weather and sea conditions, we plan to make some or all of the following stops:

Paradise Bay
The bay is aptly named because the surrounding mountains look as though they rise straight to heaven. Stretch your legs on a hike to a nearby summit for a breathtaking view, or slip into a kayak to quietly paddle along a cliffside rookery in search of blue-eyed shags.

Lemaire Channel and Petermann Island
Cruise through the narrow Lemaire Channel between towering snow-covered mountains and spectacular blue icebergs. Step ashore at Petermann Island to the cries of thousands of gentoo penguins that stand along the coast as if awaiting your arrival.

Neko Harbor
Drop anchor in beautiful Neko Harbor. Enjoy an up close encounter with the penguins on the beach or climb high onto an ice field for a panoramic vista of untouched peaks surrounding this idyllic bay.

Historic Port Lockroy
The great French explorer Jean-Baptiste Charcot named Port Lockroy a century ago. In 1944 the British government instituted the top-secret expedition code-named Operation Tabarin, creating a series of base stations in Antarctica. Base A, at Port Lockroy, was the first and now serves as a museum and Antarctica's only public post office where we can send mail to be postmarked in Antarctica.
(B,L,D)

Days 11 & 12 — At Sea

Watch for whales from the ship's bridge, attend talks by our experts, and enjoy the amenities on board.
(B,L,D)

Days 13 through 17 — South Georgia Island

The following days are devoted to exploring the magnificent coastline of South Georgia Island. The schedule is flexible, and throughout our journey there will be opportunities for walking, hiking, kayaking, and taking Zodiac excursions. Depending on weather and sea conditions, we plan to make some or all of the following stops:

King Haakon Bay
This is the site of Shackleton's landfall after his rigorous voyage in the 23-foot lifeboat, James Caird. The untouched beaches, headlands, mountains, glaciers, and nesting wandering albatrosses are a great introduction to the wilds of South Georgia.

Grytviken/Shackleton's Grave
Wander on foot, visiting the ruins of the abandoned whaling station of Grytviken and its fine museum about whaling and the island's natural history. A host of seabirds, penguins, and marine mammals can be seen as we hike along the coast to the cemetery where Sir Ernest Shackleton is buried.

Salisbury Plain/Elsehul Bay
At the height of breeding season, the northern tip of South Georgia is said to have more wildlife per square foot than any place else on Earth. We are likely to be greeted by thousands of king penguins. Visit a colony of wandering albatrosses and see colorfully crested macaroni penguins, fur and elephant seals, and gray-headed and black-browed albatrosses on their nests.

Right Whale Bay
Land on black-sand beaches, inhabited by southern fur seals, elephant seals, and king penguins, plus dozens of other bird species.

St. Andrews Bay
St. Andrews Bay is teeming with wildlife. Hike past fur and elephant seals and a colony of more than 200,000 king penguins.

Gold Harbour
Gold Harbour is home to elephant seals, thousands of fur seals and tens of thousands of penguins, including a colony of aristocratic king penguins.

Cooper Bay
Whalers once sought shelter in this small bay. Here we are likely to encounter king, gentoo, and macaroni penguins; prions; petrels; and terns; and perhaps Weddell seals.

Stromness Bay
Stromness offers views of cliffs and glaciers that legendary captain Ernest Shackleton and his companions descended to complete their famed crossing with the Endurance in 1916. Shackleton and a crew of five men had set sail in a 22-foot wooden sailboat on a 700-mile voyage across the Southern Ocean—a journey that became one of the most incredible stories of survival at sea. Explore the glacier's ice face by Zodiac. Walk along a pebble beach, passing king and gentoo penguins, and hundreds of fur seals.
(B,L,D)

Days 18 & 19 — At Sea

Enjoy talks by our experts and National Geographic photographer, and unwind in the spa, library, or on deck.

Days 20 & 21 — Falkland Islands

Dock in Port Stanley, and stroll along the streets lined with Victorian-style houses. See an archway made of whalebone at the Anglican Cathedral, and visit the Falkland Islands Museum. Hike and kayak along rocky coasts, spotting Magellanic penguins burrowing in tussock grass, herds of enormous elephant seals, and the largest albatross colony in the world.
(B,L,D)

Day 22 — At Sea

On our final day at sea, enjoy one last chance to view the marine life of these southern waters. Toast our epic voyage at a festive farewell dinner tonight.
(B,L,D)

Days 23 & 24 — Ushuaia, Argentina/Buenos Aires, Argentina (National Geographic Explorer) or Santiago, Chile (National Geographic Orion)

Disembark in Ushuaia with time to explore before our charter flight to Buenos Aires or Santiago. Continue on an overnight flight to the U.S.
(B,L)

Related Trips

Special Offer

Complimentary Airfare

Book now and receive free round-trip international airfare between Miami and Buenos Aires on the November 6, 7, and 27, 2017 departures.

Offers are for new bookings only, may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to availability. Please call for details.

Expedition Team

A diverse team of experts, including naturalists, historians, and a National Geographic photographer, will accompany each expedition aboard the National Geographic Explorer. See one of the members of our extraordinary team below.

Tyrone Turner

Tyrone TurnerTyrone Turner is an award-winning photojournalist whose assignments have taken him from Brazil to Baghdad. His work has appeared in national and international publications such as Time, Newsweek, U.S. News and World Report, and the Los Angeles Times. A contributing photographer for National Geographic magazine, he has produced stories on the disappearing wetlands of Louisiana (October 2004); increasing hurricane threats (August 2005); the coasts of the United States (July 2006); a special issue on Hurricane Katrina (Fall 2005); and the rebuilding of New Orleans (August 2007). More recently, Tyrone shot the cover story on energy efficiency and conservation for National Geographic (March 2009) and a feature article on Brazil's maroon people, the quilombos (April 2012). In 2013, he was named a Best of Photojournalism award-winner by the National Press Photographer’s Association. Tyrone has led National Geographic Expeditions Photography Workshops in Santa Fe and New Orleans, accompanied the National Geographic Explorer on a trip along the South American coast, and taught at National Geographic Photo Camps for youth from underserved regions of the United States and around the world.

Tyrone will join the following departure:

Nov 06 - 29, 2017

SEE OTHER EXPERTS »

Lindblad/National Geographic Logo

This trip is offered in association with Lindblad Expeditions.

Dates

2017
  • Nov 06 - 29, 2017 [EXP] REV
  • Nov 07 - 30, 2017 [ORION] REV
  • Nov 27 - Dec 20, 2017 [ORION] REV
2018
  • Jan 26 - Feb 18, 2018 [ORION]
  • Feb 14 - Mar 09, 2018 [EXP]
  • Feb 15 - Mar 10, 2018 [ORION]
  • Nov 05 - 28, 2018 [ORION] REV
  • Nov 06 - 29, 2018 [EXP] REV
2019
  • Feb 13 - Mar 08, 2019 [ORION]
  • Feb 14 - Mar 09, 2019 [EXP]

[ORION] National Geographic Orion
[EXP] National Geographic Explorer
REV Indicates trip operates in reverse.

Please note: On the November 6, 2017 departure, guests spend an additional day in South Georgia, flying directly from Santiago to Port Stanley. Please call for details.

Departures on the National Geographic Orion begin and end in Santiago, Chile. Departures on the National Geographic Explorer begin and end in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Add a three-day post-trip extension to Iguazu Falls (Explorer only) or a four-day post-trip extension to Easter Island to any departure. Please call for details.

Expedition Cost

2017/2018 Season Rates

Departures between November 2017 - February 2018

Explorer Orion
Category 1 $23,790 $23,790
Category 2 $25,490 $25,490
Category 3 $26,690 $27,940
Category 4 $27,940 $34,290
Category 5 $34,290 $39,570
Category 6 $39,570 $45,880
Category 7 $45,880 N/A
Category A Solo $31,860 $35,690
Category B Solo $33,360 $41,910

2018/2019 Season Rates

Departures between November 2018 - February 2019

Explorer Orion
Category 1 $23,990 $24,620
Category 2 $25,740 $26,380
Category 3 $26,950 $28,450
Category 4 $28,220 $35,660
Category 5 $34,750 $41,150
Category 6 $39,990 $47,720
Category 7 $46,450 N/A
Category A Solo $32,180 $36,930
Category B Solo $33,690 $42,670

Prices are per person, double occupancy, except those marked solo, which are based on single occupancy.

International airfare to/from Buenos Aires (Explorer), to/from Santiago (Orion), airfare within Argentina (Explorer) and Chile (Orion) is not included in the expedition cost. The group flight between Buenos Aires and Ushuaia (Explorer) begins at $850 and between Santiago and Ushuaia (Orion) begins at $890 (subject to change).

Featured Traveler Photo

Activity Level

Light/Moderate

Travelers should be in good health and comfortable walking or standing for extended periods of time. Daily activities may include city walking tours, visits to sites, game drives, or easy hikes, with options for more physical activities such as hiking, kayaking, snorkeling and biking.

Click here for a description of all activity levels.