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Select your travel style--whether it's our signature expeditions, our active outdoors adventures, or our lower-priced journeys. Or choose how you want to travel: by train or small ship, on an expedition geared for photographers or for families, and more.

Trip Styles

Expeditions

Expeditions

Our expeditions feature innovative itineraries and special access to sites and field researchers, as well as the experts and local guides who accompany us.
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Adventures

Active Adventures

Explore by foot, by camel or kayak, or even by dogsled on an active adventure that combines spectacular places, physical challenge, and cultural interaction.
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Journeys

Journeys

Our newest small-group trips, provided in partnership with G Adventures, blend fun, hands-on exploration with meaningful cultural encounters, as well as more free time and choices.
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Trip Types

Small Ship Trips

Small Ship Voyages

Take to the sea aboard one of the six ships of the National Geographic–Lindblad fleet and explore the Galápagos, Alaska, and more with a team of experts.
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Land Trips

Land Trips

Our land trips are designed to immerse you in fascinating cultures and draw out the uniqueness of each destination through enriching and authentic experiences.
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Photography

Photography

Improve your photography skills with the guidance of a National Geographic photographer— whether you’re traveling through Japan or heading out on shoots during an intensive weekend workshop in New York City.
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Private Expeditions

Private Expeditions

Explore independently—with all the benefits of traveling with National Geographic—on a private trip with the travel companions and dates of your choosing.
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Train Trips

Train Trips

Wind through dramatic mountain scenery or observe scenes of everyday life, experiencing the world through the nostalgic lens of train travel.
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Private Jet Trips

Private Jet Trips

Experience fascinating places as far-flung as Easter Island and Marrakech on one epic journey, traveling with a team of experts in the comfort of a VIP-configured jet.
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Family Trips

Family Trips

Introduce your family to the magic of travel on trips designed for travelers of all ages that combine learning, discovery, and fun.
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Student Trips

Student Expeditions

Send your high school or middle school student on assignment with National Geographic to explore inspiring destinations in depth alongside our experts and trip leaders.
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Field Notes

 

What's it like to travel with National Geographic? Take a look at these reports from the field.

By Sarah Erdman
October 2008

We descend from the scrubby, red slopes of the Atlas Mountains and find ourselves in a different Morocco. Sand-colored plateaus jut into the sky; date palms fill narrow ravines in thick, lush groves. Against the barren landscape, the men of the desert cut tall, elegant figures, solitary and mysterious, wrapped in flowing blue and black robes and turbans. The ancient casbah of Aït Benhaddou comes into view, its adobe houses climbing up the hillside, all rectangles and right angles. We sit down to lunch on a patio overlooking the village. The temperature is perfect, the couscous delicious, and we’re content to just sit here for a while gazing out at this age-old scene.

A handful of kids awaits us at the shallow river that curls between the old village and the new. They are grinning and bright-eyed, and offer a hand to steady us as we step across on a bridge of flat stones. And then we pass through a high adobe archway into another century. What we have remarked about Morocco is that everyday things are hewn with such great artistry—-so that the humblest dwelling, the most unassuming street corner is adorned with brilliant tiles or bits of stained glass or elaborately sculpted stucco. Aït Benhaddou is no exception. As we wind up the hill of this village made of mud, we find carefully crenellated rooftops, geometric cutouts in the clay, wooden doors intricately carved and studded with brass. Out of simplicity, the villagers have rendered such beauty.

We stop for tea at the home of a Berber woman whose hands show the russet stain of henna. Her daughter, a lean teenager in jeans, joins us. She lazily plays with the net scarf that covers her hair. Her T-shirt is black and emblazoned with English words she doesn’t understand. Upon closer inspection, the decal appears to be, of all things, a personal ad calling for a "good-looking and muscular man who likes to cook."

We look out over these clay rooftops aglow with afternoon sun, sipping mint tea, contemplating the sparks of irony that flash when the modern world collides with the timelessness of the past.

Note: Sarah Erdman, a program director at National Geographic Expeditions, wrote these field notes on an advance trip while developing our expedition to Morocco.