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Select your travel style--whether it's our signature expeditions, our active outdoors adventures, or our lower-priced journeys. Or choose how you want to travel: by train or small ship, on an expedition geared for photographers or for families, and more.

Small Ship Trips

Small Ship Voyages

Take to the sea aboard one of the six ships of the National Geographic–Lindblad fleet and explore the Galápagos, Alaska, and more with a team of experts.
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Land Trips

Land Trips

Our land trips are designed to immerse you in fascinating cultures and draw out the uniqueness of each destination through enriching and authentic experiences.
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Private Jet Trips

Private Jet Trips

Experience fascinating places as far-flung as Easter Island and Marrakech on one epic journey, traveling with a team of experts in the comfort of a VIP-configured jet.
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Adventures

Active Adventures

Explore by foot, by camel or kayak, or even by dogsled on an active adventure that combines spectacular places, physical challenge, and cultural interaction.
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Journeys

Journeys

Our newest small-group trips, provided in partnership with G Adventures, blend fun, hands-on exploration with meaningful cultural encounters, as well as more free time and choices, all for an unbeatable value.
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Photography

Photography

Improve your photography skills with the guidance of a National Geographic photographer— whether you’re traveling through Japan or heading out on shoots during an intensive weekend workshop in New York City.
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Private Expeditions

Private Expeditions

Explore independently—with all the benefits of traveling with National Geographic—on a private trip with the travel companions and dates of your choosing.
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Train Trips

Train Trips

Wind through dramatic mountain scenery or observe scenes of everyday life, experiencing the world through the nostalgic lens of train travel.
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Family Trips

Family Trips

Introduce your family to the magic of travel on trips designed for travelers of all ages that combine learning, discovery, and fun.
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Student Trips

Student Expeditions

Send your high school or middle school student on assignment with National Geographic to explore inspiring destinations in depth alongside our experts and trip leaders.
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Christopher Sloan

Specialties: Editor, Author

Christopher Sloan is an award-winning author and art director who specializes in bringing non-visual scientific research to life for diverse audiences. Christopher worked with National Geographic magazine from 1992 to 2010 as Art Director, Senior Editor, and Director of Mission Projects. During this time, he played a key role in developing and producing the magazine’s archaeology, paleoanthropology, and paleontology stories as well as other stories about the Society’s grantees. These include many popular cover stories, such as Dawn of Humans, Neanderthals, Evolution of Mammals, Sea Monsters, Rise and Fall of the Maya, Bizarre Dinosaurs, and Secrets of Stonehenge. Christopher has also written feature articles for National Geographic, including “Found: Earliest Child,” the November 2006 cover story about the discovery of a 3.3 million-year-old baby human ancestor in Ethiopia. While on a dig in remote western China, he discovered a new genus of prehistoric crocodile—Jungaarsuchus sloanii—that now bears his name.

Christopher's enthusiasm for communicating about science to a broad audience extends to popular literature and children’s books. What Does it Mean to be Human?, co-authored with Rick Potts, is a companion book to the popular new Human Origins hall of Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Christopher has also written eight award-winning children’s books for National Geographic, including Mummies, How Dinosaurs Took Flight,and The Human Story, prepared in collaboration with Meave Leakey.

As a science communicator, Christopher enjoys lecturing on visualizing science. Currently, he serves as chairman of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology’s Lanzendorf Paleoart Committee and is an active member of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Evolutionary Synthesis Center workshop on improving public understanding of human origins. He is president of Science Visualization, a Washington, D.C.-area-based company that specializes in developing science content for television, exhibitions, and print.

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